Philadelphia Public Art @philart.net

Year: 2017

A Quest for Parity: The Octavius V. Catto Memorial
Branly Cadet, 2017
* Memorial to and statue of Octavius Catto
* big and small standing person, ideas, cube and mirrored orb, steles representing a streetcar and a representational streetcar, buildings, plants, horse, clouds, groups of people, some sitting, hats, guns, baseball equipment
* inscription:
South side of steles, North side of cube:
There must come a change which will force upon this nation that course which providence seems wisely to be directing for the mutual benefit of all peoples.
West side of steles, West side of cube:
Educator Leader Major Athlete Activist
South side of cube: October 10, 1871
East side of cube:
XV
Amendment to the United States Constitution
The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.
North side of steles:
1839 Born February 22 in Charleston, South Carolina
1854 Becomes a student at the Philadelphia Institute for Colored Youth
1858 Graduates from the Institute for Colored Youth
1859 Chosen as a member and recording secretary of the Banneker Institute, an all black literary society led by Jacob White, Jr. Hired as an English and mathematics teacher at his alma mater. Campaign to desegregate the horse-drawn streetcars in Philadelphia begins.
1863 becomes a member of the Pennsylvania National Guard. Helps lead a civil war recruitment committee with Frederick Douglas, members of the Union League, and others, which raises eleven regiments of black troops who trained at Camp William Penn in Cheltenham.
1864 Named corresponding secretary of the Pennsylvania Equal Rights League, an affiliate of the National Equal Rights League. Appointed Vice President of the State Convention of Colored People held in Harrisburg. Led civil disobedience protests and lobbied white legislators in Harrisburg to desegregate streetcars.
1865 Co-authored the state Equal Rights League call for voting rights, streetcar desegregation, and the hiring of black teachers for black students in public schools.
1867 Governor signs statewide "Bill of Rights" law desegregating streetcars. Led the Pythians Base Ball Club of Philadelphia to an undefeated season.
1869 Named principal of male students at the Institute for Colored Youth Pythians play the Olympic Ball Club in Philadelphia in the first match between black and white teams. A leader of the unsuccessful effort to integrate the private City Wide Congress of Literary Societies. Helps lead successful Pennsylvania campaign to pass the 15th Amendment which led to thousands of black men registering to vote.
1870 The Union League presents Octavius Catto, Frederick Douglas, and Robert Purvis with a banner celebrating Pennsylvania's adoption of the 15th Amendment at a ceremony on Broad Street. Writes curriculum for new schools for freed former slaves in the District of Columbia. Becomes a member of the original Franklin Institute breaking the color line at the prestigious national forum for advancing American science and technology.
1871 Named an Inspector General with the rank of Major in the Pennsylvania National Guard. Shot to death on October 10, on South Street in the midst of election day riots. He was 32, and one of many black men shot or attacked that day by opponents of the 15th Amendment. As one of Philadelphia's most influential leaders, more than 5,000 mourners attended his funeral and procession down Broad Street.
* South side of City Hall. North side of S. Penn Square at Broad.
* 39.951775,-75.164100 [map]
* On the City Hall tour
* Exhibits: Athletic, War, African American
* See also:
+branlycadet.com
+wikipedia.org's Octavius Catto page
+philadelphiabuildings.org's City Hall page
+wikipedia.org's City Hall page




Declaration of Independence
Tiequn Geng, Guangxi Qihe Bronze Studio, Dr. Komuro Hiromi, Dr. QiongZhao (Ellen) Schicktanz, John Trumbull, 2017 (installed)
* Full figure reliefs of John Adams, Samuel Adams, Josiah Bartlett, Charles Carroll, Samuel Chase, Abraham Clark, George Clinton, George Clymer, John Dickinson, William Ellery, William Floyd, Benjamin Franklin, Elbridge Gerry, John Hancock, Benjamin Harrison V, Joseph Hewes, Thomas Heyward Jr., William Hooper, Stephen Hopkins, Francis Hopkinson, Samuel Huntington, Thomas Jefferson, Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lewis, Philip Livingston, Robert R. Livingston, Thomas Lynch Jr., Thomas McKean, Arthur Middleton, Lewis Morris, Robert Morris, William Paca, Robert Treat Paine, George Read, Benjamin Rush, Edward Rutledge, Roger Sherman, Richard Stockton, Charles Thomson, George Walton, William Whipple, William Williams, Thomas Willing, James Wilson, John Witherspoon, Oliver Wolcott and George Wythe
* small people, some standing, some sitting, furniture, paper and pens, interior of Independence Hall
* inscription: (partial)
This bronze sculpture replicates John Trumbull's famous painting Declaration of Independence that is displayed in the Rotunda of the United States Capitol. It depicts the presentation of the Declaration of Independence to the Continental Congress in Independence Hall on June 28, 1776, by the drafting committee, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Roger Sherman and Robert Livingston (shown seated to the left of the table).
Forty-two of the 56 signers of the Declaration are portrayed; Trumbull originally intended to include the 56 signers, but was unable to obtain likenesses for all of them. He also portrayed five people who did not sign the Declaraion, but who were present on June 28th. Because the Declaration was debated and signed over a period of six to eight weeks, the men shown here were never in Independence Hall at the same time.
The sculpture is a donation from Dr. QiongZhao (Ellen) Schicktanz, a naturalized Asian-American artist, in gratitude for her life as an American Citizen.
* North wall. Museum of the American Revolution. South side of Chestnut, East of 3rd.
* 39.948500,-75.145750 [map]
* On the Old City tour
* See also:
+wikipedia.org's page for the original painting
+americangoddessartmuseum.com (Ellen Schicktanz)
+wikipedia.org's John Trumbull page
+wikipedia.org's John Adams page
+wikiedia.org's Samuel Adams page
+wikipedia.org's Josiah Bartlett page
+wikipedia.org's Charles Carroll page
+wikipedia.org's Samuel Chase page
+wikipedia.org's Abraham Clark page
+wikipedia.org's George Clinton page
+wikipedia.org's George Clymer page
+wikipedia.org's John Dickinson page
+wikipedia.org's William Ellery page
+wikipedia.org's William Floyd page
+The Electric Franklin
+wikipedia.org's Elbridge Gerry page
+wikipedia.org's John Hancock page
+wikipedia.org's Benjamin Harrison V page
+wikipedia.org's Joseph Hewes page
+wiki[edia.org's Thomas Heyward Jr. page
+wikipedia.org's William Hooper page
+wikipedia.org's Stephen Hopkins page
+wikipedia.org's Francis Hopkinson page
+wikipedia.org's Samuel Huntington page
+wikipedia.org's Thomas Jefferson page
+wikipedia.org's Richard Henry Lee page
+wikipedia.org's Francis Lewis page
+wikipedia.org's Philip Livingston page
+wikipedia.org's Robert R. Livingston page
+wikipedia.org's Thomas Lynch Jr. page
+wikipedia.org's Thomas McKean page
+wikipedia.org's Arthur Middleton page
+wikipedia.org's Lewis Morris page
+wikipedia.org's Robert Morris page
+wikipedia.org's William Paca page
+wikipedia.org's Robert Treat Paine page
+wikipedia.org's George Read page
+wikipedia.org's Benjamin Rush page
+wikipedia.org's Edward Rutledge page
+wikipedia.org's Roger Sherman page
+wikipedia.org's Richard Stockton page
+wikipedia.org's Charles Thomson page
+wikipedia.org's George Walton page
+wikipedia.org's William Whipple page
+wikipedia.org's William Williams page
+wikipedia.org's Thomas Willing page
+wikipedia.org's James Wilson page
+wikipedia.org's John Witherspoon page
+wikipedia.org's Oliver Wolcott page
+wikipedia.org's George Wythe page
+amrevmuseum.org




The Arsenal of Independence
2017
* Reference to Benjamin Flower
* cannon barrels, sign
* inscription: (partial)
Imagine this neighborhood filled with the sights, sounds, and smells of war. Philadelphia's tradesmen and women produced muskets, cannon, ammunition, wagons, ships, uniforms and flags that helped to win American Independence. In 1775, hat maker Benjamin Flower lived just a block from where you are standing. He joined the Revolutionary cause and became Commissary General of Military Stores for the Continental Army.
* in front of the Museum of the American Revolution. Southeast Corner, 3rd and Chestnut.
* 39.948525,-75.145935 [map]
* On the Old City tour
* Exhibits: War
* See also:
+Orders to Benjamin Flower from George Washington
+amrevmuseum.org




The Bond
James West, 2017
* Statue of Benjamin Franklin and George Washington
* two people standing, Masonic emblem
* inscription:
Brother George Washington, Commander in Chief of the Continental Army, first President of the United States, and member of Alexandria Lodge (Fairfax County, Virginia) shows his Masonic Apron to Brother Benjamin Franklin, diplomat who negotiated French involvement in our independence. Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania and Master of the Loge Les Neuf Soeurs, in Paris. It was a gift from Brother General Lafayette, member of the Loge Contrat Social of Paris, who represented the French government and their commitment to American Independence.
* In front of the Masonic Temple. Northeast corner, Broad and JFK.
* 39.953510,-75.163150 [map]
* On the City Hall tour
* See also:
+studiowildwest.com
+The Electric Franklin
+wikipedia.org's George Washington page
+pamasonictemple.org




Washington Crossing the Delaware
Guangxi Qihe Bronze Studio, Emanuel Leutze, Dr. QiongZhao (Ellen) Schicktanz, 2017 (installed)
* Full figure relief of George Washington
* small people, mostly seated, some standing, hats, weapons, flag, boat with oars, clouds, horses
* inscription: (partial)
This bronze sculpture replicates the famous painting, Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanuel Leutze. It depicts Gen. George Washington leading the Continental Army on a dangerous nighttime crossing of the Delaware River on December 25, 1776 to attack Hessian troops stationed at Trenton. His attack was a final, desperate effort to gain a victory after months of defeats had reduced the Army to a small, exhausted, and demoralized force. Washington's success at Trenton reinvigorated the American cause and kept the Revolution alive.
The painting captures the drama, danger, and desperation of the river crossing, even though a number of details are historically inaccurate, such as the type of boat. The artist, Emanuel Luenze, grew up and was trained in Philadelphia, but created the painting in 1850 after he returned to his native Germany. The painting was a sensation when it was displayed in America the following year.
The sculpture is a donation from Dr. QiongZhao (Ellen) Schicktanz, a naturalized Asian-American artist, in gratitude for her life as an American Citizen.
* North wall. Museum of the American Revolution. South side of Chestnut, East of 3rd.
* 39.948495,-75.145650 [map]
* On the Old City tour
* Exhibits: War
* See also:
+wikipedia.org's Emanuel Leutze page
+americangoddessartmuseum.com (Ellen Schicktanz)
+wikipedia.org's George Washington page
+amrevmuseum.org